Week of September 26, 2016

It’s the last week of September and the first full week of fall! Time is flying!

Please consider VOTING for our Marching Shoremen in the Best High School Band in Greater Cleveland contest! You can vote more than once (after a cooling off period.) We’ve moved up from 9th to 7th in a few short hours, so WE CAN DO IT!!! 🙂

Due to the special bell schedule and reduced class time this past Wednesday, we are repeating some of the things from last week’s blog because we did not get to them.

This Week in Physics
On Monday we will finish assignments 2 & 3 so that we can take a quiz over goal set 3 on Tuesday. Also for Tuesday please take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 7 – Introduction to Kinematic Equations and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 8 – Kinematic Equations Sample Problem. Then for Wednesday please take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 9 – Introduction to Free FallMotion in One Dimension Podcast 10 – Free Fall Sample Problems, and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 11 – Terminal Velocity. We will do assignment 4 toward the end of the week. Expect your unit 1 test early next week. NOTE: 11th period had the least class time with me last week due to the special bell schedule. You will follow these assignments one day behind the rest of the other classes. On Monday and Tuesday we will finish assignments 2 & 3.

Cool Science of the Week
In an interesting mix of chemistry, photography, and race relations, this video explains the evolution of the chemical composition of photographic film as companies have striven to correct an older bias toward light skin tones in pictures. Science plays a role in all facets of life!

Week of September 19

This week marks the interim of our first quarter – wow!

This Week in Physics
First of all, please sign up for Remind.com if you haven’t already. Second, please read the assignments for your class period.
If you are in 1st: On Monday we will take our quiz over both goal set 1 and goal set 2. In addition, by Monday please take notes on both Motion in One Dimension Podcast 5 – Introduction to Acceleration and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 6 – Acceleration Signs vs. Velocity Signs. We will briefly debrief these brief podcasts and will then toss some cars back on the tracks to analyze accelerated motion graphs. Next we will do assignments 2 & 3 together in class. On the day after we finish these assignments, we will take a quiz over goal set 3. For that day please also take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 7 – Introduction to Kinematic Equations and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 8 – Kinematic Equations Sample Problem. When announced please also take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 9 – Introduction to Free FallMotion in One Dimension Podcast 10 – Free Fall Sample Problems, and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 11 – Terminal Velocity. Expect a unit test by the end of next week.
If you are in 4th/5th: Your assignments are exactly the same as 1st period’s.
If you are in 8th/9th: For Monday please finish both assignment 1 and the work on goal set 2 from your goal pakcet. Then read the blog for 1st period (above) and follow it with a one-day shift so that your quiz is on Tuesday, and so on.
If you are in 11th: On Monday we will continue to work on assignment 1 and goal set 2 from our goal packet. If you do not finish in class, please finish both assignment 1 and the work on goal set 2 from your goal packet. In addition, due Tuesday, please take notes on both Motion in One Dimension Podcast 5 – Introduction to Acceleration and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 6 – Acceleration Signs vs. Velocity Signs. On Wednesday we will take a quiz over goal set 1 and goal set 2. Next we will do assignments 2 & 3 together in class. On the day after we finish these assignments, we will take a quiz over goal set 3. For that day please also take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 7 – Introduction to Kinematic Equations and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 8 – Kinematic Equations Sample Problem. When announced please also take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 9 – Introduction to Free FallMotion in One Dimension Podcast 10 – Free Fall Sample Problems, and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 11 – Terminal Velocity. Expect a unit test by the end of next week.

Cool Science of the Week
Astrophysicists trying to understand the nature and origin of the universe (from a scientific perspective) often search for gravitational waves, or distortions in the dimensions of space and time, as predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Recently scientists from the LIGO (an observatory run by Caltech and MIT in Pasadena) detected gravitational waves from a collision of two black holes that are 1.4 BILLION light years away. Nothing, including gravitational waves, travels faster than the speed of light (which Einstein also proved), so, in scientific terms, that means that the collision occurred 1.4 billion years ago, which also means that these black holes are now most likely one single supermassive black hole!

Stupid Awesomeness of the Week

Video link

Week of September 12, 2016

This Week in Physics
We will start off the week by examining graphs of position v time and velocity v time in ever increasing depth by completing assignment 1 together in class. We will also spend two days learning how to write lab reports. The following documents will guide us:

Your lab report is due on Friday, September 16 at the start of your class period. You will need to turn in one hard copy of your report in class, and you will need to have one person from your writing team upload one copy of your report to TurnItIn.com. The class ID is 13544558, and the password is Einstein. You can upload your report directly from Google Drive to TurnItIn.com using these instructions. The upload to TurnItIn.com is due by 3:00 on Friday.

Toward the end of the week, depending on the pace of your individual class, we may take a quiz over learning goal sets 1 & 2. Then, if assigned, please take notes on Podcast 5 – Introduction to Acceleration.

Cool Science of the Week
This past week the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) banned nineteen ingredients commonly used in antibacterial soaps, citing potential health risks from long-term use. They acknowledged that simply washing with regular soap and water is just as effective as using soaps with antibacterial ingredients. A side benefit of this decision may be to prevent bacteria from evolving to be resistant to antibacterial chemicals, which are still used appropriately in such settings as hospitals. We do know that bacteria can become resistant to antibiotics, and researchers this week shared evidence of this occurring within the confines of a petri dish. Bacteria that can resist antibiotics and/or antibacterial chemicals can become a threat to the health of humans and other living organisms.

Week of September 5, 2016

Happy Labor Day! This national holiday honors the hard work and sacrifices of the citizens of the labor movement along with their contributions to our country.

This Week in Physics
Early in the week we will continue our experiment on uniform motion. At the conclusion of the experiment we will analyze our results together and draw conclusions. For the day after your group has collected and analyzed your data, your homework will be to take notes on the very short Podcast 4. (I will announce this in class so you know exactly when to watch that podcast.) We’ll then discuss the content of that podcast and will complete assignment 1 from unit 1 together in class followed by a quiz as announced. Next Tuesday and Wednesday (September 13 and 14) we will discuss how to write lab reports, looking at both the lab report writing guide and the lab report rubric, and we’ll use the Chrome Books to start writing. Your lab reports will be due on Friday, September 16, but please don’t start writing until we begin with the Chrome Books in class.
*Pro-Tip: One of your fellow students pointed out that http://www.wixsite.com/ allows you to create your own mini web page to organize your bookmarks for all of the websites your teachers give you. It’s free and easy to use. Maybe you’ll like it!

Cool Science of the Week
We discussed multiple dimensions in class this past week, but it sure is a hard thing to imagine for us four-dimensional mortals. This video helps make it a little clearer…. Of course, we can only prove the existence of four dimensions, but physics speculates that there could be many more!

Week of August 29, 2016

Congratulations on making it through the drudgery of the first week! Now let’s have some FUN! (*Reminder to former students receiving this in email form…There is an unsubscribe link at the bottom of the email.)

This Week in Physics
1.) Please be sure to subscribe to this blog. If you choose not to, you’ll need to return to sgbscience.net every Friday to learn about your future.
2.) Please sign up for our Remind.com.
3.) If you did not turn in the signature page from our Course Policies and Procedures document, please be sure to do so this week.
4.) Assignments: By Monday please do two things:
****** First, please view the “How to Do Conversions in Physics” podcast on the
How Do I…? page of our website. I expect you to be proficient in doing conversions, and this method helps. If you need extra practice, you can (optionally) do the section on conversions on our Extra Math Help practice page and check your work with me. You also need to be fluent in writing and reading scientific notation. If you need extra help with that, the math help practice page also has a section on that topic along with resources. Feel free to try those problems and check your work with me.
****** Second, please take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 1 – Distance v. DisplacementMotion in One Dimension Podcast 2 – Displacement & Direction, and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 3 – Speed vs. Velocity. We will go over these and will then dive into a short activity that will lead up to our first lab, which we’ll begin most likely mid-week. (Your lab report won’t be due until we’ve gone over how to write our lab reports.) It is possible that by the end of the week you may need to take notes on Podcast 4 – Slope of Position vs. Time Equals Velocity, but please do not do so until AFTER we finish the lab. (It contains secrets!)

Cool Science of the Week
One of the most fascinating areas in astronomy today is the search for exoplanets, or planets outside of our solar system. To date, we have discovered 3,374 exoplanets, 570 multi-planet solar systems, and 4.696 additional planet candidates. One of the questions scientists seek to answer about each new planet discovered is how similar the planet is to Earth. Most planets are too hot or too cold or too gassy to be considered as candidates for life or human exploration, but some planets are in the “Goldilocks Zone” with temperatures that could support liquid water, an essential ingredient for the kind of life forms we have on Earth. Amazingly, scientists this week announced the discovery of an Earth-like planet in the Goldilocks Zone around not some distant star but orbiting the CLOSEST star to us! The very short video below will tell you more.

This second 33-second video shows you what it would look like if you took a spaceship on the 4.25 light year (24,946,282,800,000 mile) journey to the planet. Happy travels!

Disclaimer: It would take more than 33 seconds to travel there. LOL

Week of August 22, 2016

Welcome to another great school year! If you are new to my classes, please be sure to subscribe to my blog by entering your email along the right side of this webpage. Then be sure to check your inbox for an activation link.

This Week in Physics

This week we will take a 45-minute assessment to provide data required by the State of Ohio. We will also take a physics readiness assessment. Let me reassure you that neither of these tests will count for a grade. They are merely skills and prior knowledge assessments.

By Friday you must review the Physics Course Policies and Procedures document with a parent or guardian and print/sign the final page. This signed final page is due by Friday, August 26. With the time we have left, we may begin Unit 1 – Motion in One Dimension.

By Monday please take notes on Motion in One Dimension Podcast 1 – Distance v. Displacement and Motion in One Dimension Podcast 2 – Displacement & Direction. We will work through that material and do some practice problems followed by a quiz later in the week of August 29.

Summer 2016!

Congratulations on completing your year of physics! Please read the important notes below.

AP Physics
Please take a moment to fill out my AP course survey. It is important to me to reflect on and improve my teaching, so I’d really appreciate your feedback. In addition, here is the website to access your AP scores. Ohio’s scores will post on Thursday, July 7 at 8:00 a.m. From the College Board: “Sign up now for a College Board account on the student AP score website. It’s required to get scores. Some students may already have an account. Have them confirm this by signing in. Remember their account username and password, and their 2016 AP number (or student ID number if they provided it on their AP answer sheet).” That should take care of your scores for you! Finally, if you’d no longer like to receive my posts via email, please scroll to the bottom of this message and click the unsubscribe link. Thank you for a great year! I’ve just loved working with you all and wish you nothing but the best!

Physics
Please take a moment to fill out my physics course survey. It is important to me to reflect on and improve my teaching, so I’d really appreciate your feedback. Finally, if you’d no longer like to receive my posts via email, please scroll to the bottom of this message and click the unsubscribe link. I’ve really loved getting to know all of you this year and hope you have a wonderful summer!

Weeks of May 16, May 23rd, and May 30, 2016

Welcome to the end of the year! On Friday we will head to Cedar Point for some intense real-world physics investigations, AND this is the last full week of school for our seniors! With that in mind, I’m sharing the exam schedules. Senior exams run next week from May 24-26. In addition, junior exams begin next Friday, May 27 and continue on Tuesday and Wednesday, May 31 and June 1. Schedules are below.

Senior Exam Schedule

Junior Exam Schedule

Now for your assignments…

These Weeks in AP Physics
We will prep for Cedar Point by looking at the rides you will investigate. You’ll have a chance to brainstorm your experimental approach to each ride with your team. Don’t lose sight, though, of the fact that your technical drawings of your pinewood derby car need to be completed asap so that you can take it home to shape. You WILL need a parent acknowledgement signed and returned to me before you can take your car. It is important to get your car shaped as soon as possible so that you can (use your mating dimensions drawing) to assemble it and then do test runs. Our race will be the week of May 23rd, so stay on task. Remember also that you will have to write a scholarly journal article justifying your design and analyzing your tests. It ain’t over yet, angels! At least this is fun stuff, though. 🙂

These Weeks in Physics
Beginning on Monday we will begin to prep for Cedar Point by reviewing key concepts from throughout the year. Once we are done with that, we will continue our examination of waves, sound, and physics applications in musical instruments. Your mega-quiz on waves and sound will be sometime the week of May 23rd. After that we will begin exam preparations.

Cool Science of these Weeks
On Monday, May 9, Mercury passed directly between Earth and the Sun, creating something astronomers call “transit.” This time-lapse video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, shows the event, which lasted 7-1/2 hours. It’s amazing to me to see the immensity of the sun in relation to this tiny world. You’ll notice in the video that NASA presented several views of the sun using different filters. Some of these filters give nice views of solar prominences, and other views allow you a to see sunspots.

Week of May 9, 2016

This Week in AP Physics
YOU DID IT! Congratulations on all you’ve accomplished this year! Now onto our pinewood derby engineering project! Remember: NO USE OF THE INTERWEBS!!!

This Week in Physics
If you’re in third period, your unit 8 test is on Monday. For everyone, this week marks the beginning of our bonus unit on sound. Musicians take note: Please consider bringing your instruments to class when we’re ready (later in the week) so that we can see how physics makes them work.

Cool Science of the Week
With the NFL draft over, it’s interesting to see how science can help teams choose their picks. The ESPN sports science lab tested the acceleration abilities and vision of the Viking’s first-round pick, Laquon Treadwell and the Redskin’s Josh Doctson. Not that the Browns didn’t do a good job, but this video makes me kind of jealous!

Week of May 2, 2016

This Week in AP Physics
This is it! Study hard and, above all, relax and think positive thoughts. You’ve worked hard all year. Go in with confidence! 🙂AP Test Schedule

This Week in Physics
We will finish our unit on electric circuits by completing assignment 4 and will take the unit 8 test by the end of the week.

Cool Science of the Week
Earth Day was this past weekend, and to celebrate, the New York Times shared a story about the world’s oldest tree. Now, you may have heard of the sequoia trees in California’s Sequoia National Park. They’re famous for being very, very tall and extremely old, up to about 2700 years old! Amazing, right? Well, those trees are mere youngsters compared to the world’s true oldest tree, Methuselah, which is 4847 years old. Stop and think about that. That’s 3000 B.C., the Bronze Age. Stonehenge was just beginning to be constructed, and Mesopotamia and Egypt were just emerging as major civilizations. And Methuselah was born. Methuselah is a bristlecone pine that lives in Inyo National Forest in California. Park rangers will not disclose which tree Methuselah is in order to protect it from vandals and over-eager scientists. However, if you go to Inyo, you’re sure to see many trees that are many thousands of years old. Very cool.

This image is not Methuselah but is a different bristlecone pine in Inyo National Forest, California.